BC Adaptive Mentorship Network for Pain, Mental Health and Substance Use

Providing care in the clinical areas of chronic pain, mental health and substance use, either alone or as co-morbidities, can be challenging. The BC Adaptive Mentorship Network for Pain, Mental Health and Substance Use (BCAMN) aims to build primary care capacity to support British Columbians living with chronic pain, mental health and substance use conditions.

BCAMN is intended for community-based primary care providers and allied health care professionals. It connects health care provider Mentees with professional Mentors on the topics of chronic pain, mental health and substance use through safe, non-judgmental group-based mentoring and learning opportunities, and on-demand one-to-one mentoring conversations. Mentors and Mentees come from a wide variety of primary care disciplines (including medicine, nursing, physiotherapy, social work and more) and from all regions of British Columbia.

Launch

BCAMN launches in March 2022 with eight Mentors each facilitating a small group of Mentees. The groups will initially meet monthly but may adapt their meeting schedule to meet the preference of the group members. One-to-one mentoring will be available outside of the small groups. There will also be opportunities to engage in province-wide and national workshops, and engagement in a National Adaptive Mentoring Forum – an online community of practice for Mentors and Mentees across Canada.

Compensation and funding

There is no cost to Mentees who join BCAMN. CME credits are being sought for physician Mentees who engage in BCAMN activities. Mentors are compensated for their time.

BCAMN is supported by a funding agreement from Health Canada’s Substance Use and Addictions Program provided to the Centre for Effective Practice, the Atlantic Mentorship Network – Pain & Addiction, and Pain BC.

Frequently asked questions

Adaptive mentorship is a safe, non-judgmental experience providing opportunities for clinical conversations tailored to Mentees’ evolving needs. Adaptive mentorship is not a consultative service; rather, it provides an opportunity for Mentees to build knowledge and skills in a supportive networking environment.

Three fundamental tenets of adaptive mentorship:

  • Ensure the form of mentorship is adaptive and fits the needs of the participants
  • Ensure there is bidirectional value/learning for both Mentor and Mentee
  • Create safe and compassionate spaces that cultivate trust and enhance resiliency amongst participants

Adaptive mentorship encourages capacity building through:

  • Examining and addressing systemic and clinical barriers to timely access and supports for people experiencing chronic pain, mental health and substance use conditions1
  • Building and enhancing connections between specialized services and community/primary care1
  • Encouraging longitudinal support that is well aligned with complex care needs1

Adaptive mentorship can include different:

  • Environments: in-person, email, phone, video conferencing
  • Forms of mentoring: one-to-one, group, peer
  • Purposes/durations: discussing single cases vs. longitudinal spanning years

1Webinar on adaptive mentoring: Building compassionate primary care capacity

An evaluation of the Collaborative Mental Health Network and Medical Mentoring for Addictions and Pain Network, and Ontario adaptive mentorship network on which BCAMN’s model is based, showed:

High satisfaction among Mentees:

  • 90% reported improvement in their knowledge1
  • 83% reported improvement in their competence around clinical skills1
  • 82% reported improvement in their confidence in managing care for people with complex health conditions1
  • 70% reported a positive impact on patients’ quality of life2

Beneficial system impact:

  • 60% reported seeing more patients with complex health conditions who live with chronic pain, mental health or substance use1
  • 40% reported a decrease in seeking consultations1
  • 60% reported being able to assist colleagues with patients who have complex conditions1

A Radhakrishnan et. al. Healthcare Quarterly Vol 22 No 3 2019
Webinar on adaptive mentoring: Building compassionate primary care capacity

Mentors plan engagement with Mentees by:

  • Collaborating with BCAMN Co-Directors and Coordinator in developing and delivering creative evidence-based initiatives that enhance the learning experiences of Mentees
  • Assisting in the development of small group meeting design, format and content aimed to facilitate growth and learning for Mentees
  • Working with the Coordinator and Co-Directors to schedule and deliver small group sessions

Mentors engage with Mentees by:

  • Providing advice and support within the scope of clinical expertise
  • Covering key competencies while helping Mentees navigate clinical situations
  • Providing one-to-one mentorship to Mentees
  • Responding to Mentees’ communications within 48-72 hours
  • Hosting in-person and/or virtual small group sessions with support from BCAMN Coordinator
  • Contributing to discussions via the National Adaptive Mentoring Forum
  • Supporting the development of compassionate, non-judgmental learning communities

Mentees engage in BCAMN by:

  • Attending and actively participating in group mentoring sessions
  • Responding to Mentors’ communications within 48-72 hours
  • Interacting collaboratively with BCAMN community, including Mentors, Medical Co-Directors and the Coordinator, to ensure a rich and meaningful Mentee experience
  • Complying with the guidelines set out within BCAMN for one-to-one communications and group interactions
  • Participating in network communication and activities, including the National Adaptive Mentoring Forum, as needed

Mentees support BCAMN by:

  • Providing input and feedback to BCAMN leadership and support team
  • Providing insight and input on strategies to gain momentum and support for BCAMN
  • Promoting the merits of mentoring, along with informing and influencing the larger system, in a climate of continuous quality improvement

Clinical Directors 

Sean Ebert

Sean Ebert, BSc, MD, CCFP (FPA), FCFP, FRRMS

Sean has been a rural physician for the past 25 years. His work includes anesthesia which has enhanced his opportunity to work with acute and chronic pain patients. Sean has been privileged to serve in leadership capacities in multiple organizations. His current leadership work is with the Rural Coordinating Centre of BC, the BC Patient Safety and Quality Council, Divisions of Family Practice and now Pain BC. Sean is a passionate student of quality improvement and system change.

 

 

 

Brenda Poulton

Brenda Poulton, RN, MN, NP (retired)

Brenda has an extensive background in healthcare from frontline nurse to educator to Nurse Practitioner and most recently as the Clinical Lead for Pain in Fraser Health. Brenda has passionately pursued bringing change and improvement for those living in pain, supporting practitioners providing pain care and system change in the last two decades. Brenda is honoured to be involved in the development of BCAMN and to support the practitioners within the mentorship network.

Mentors

Barbara Eddy

Barbara Eddy

Barb Eddy is a nurse practitioner and practises primary care in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver since 2007 and on the North Shore since 2020. Prior, she was a clinical nurse specialist with the Vancouver Home Hospice team, a nurse educator and home care nurse. Most recently Barb championed the start of the Vancouver Community pain service to offer non-pharmacological pain interventions to those living with homelessness, poverty, substance use disorders and mental health conditions. Barb has been offering myoActivation since 2017 to her primary care and pain service patients. She is currently completing a research study to better understand the impact of myoActivation. Barb is an adjunct assistant professor with the UBC School of nursing and an associate with the Division of Palliative Care, UBC Department of Medicine. 

Areas of specialty:
care for people with pain, complex trauma, and substance use living in marginalized living conditions; primary care with focus on mental health and addictions; team based care; palliative care for structurally vulnerable persons; myoActivation; clinical research; NP practise and patient centered care

 

Natasha Edney

Natasha Edney

Natasha is a Psychotherapist, Somatic Trauma Therapist, and Mindfulness Teacher (MBSR), with a special interest in exploring the connection between chronic pain/ disease and underlying trauma. She has 18 years' experience in private practice, and now works from Solis Integrative Health Centre specializing in chronic pain and trauma. In addition to her psychotherapy practice Natasha facilitates Chronic Pain Support Groups, co-designed/facilitates an Integrative Health Program providing education and self-management tools for chronic pain patients and facilitates Pain BC’s Making Sense of Pain program, including redesigning the program for an online format and mentoring MSOP facilitators. Natasha sits on the Kootenay Boundary Division of Family Practice Chronic Pain Project Steering Committee.

Areas of specialty:
mental health, chronic pain, trauma and mindfulness practices

 

Annabel Mead

Annabel Mead

Dr. Mead is an addiction medicine physician with expertise in concurrent psychiatric disorders, pain management and women’s health. She is a Fellow of the Australasian Chapter of Addiction Medicine, a diplomate of the American Board of Addiction Medicine and Clinical Assistant Professor, UBC. She holds the positions of Senior Medical Director, Mental Health and Substance Use, BC Women’s Hospital and Medical Director, Corrections Health Services. She consults on the Addiction Medicine Consult Service at St Paul’s Hospital, and for New Dawn Recovery House. Dr. Mead is an established teacher, mentor and educator. She is past Director of the BCCSU Addiction Medicine Fellowship training program, speaks widely at conferences and continues as an Education Committee member of the International Society of Addiction Medicine.

Areas of specialty:
acute and chronic pain management in the setting of OAT, high opioid tolerance, other substance use disorders, trauma and polypharmacy

 

Neil Pearson

Neil Pearson

Neil is a physical therapist, yoga therapist and Clinical Assistant Professor at the University of British Columbia, and faculty in four accredited yoga therapy programs. He is also a consultant to the BC medical association, and to Lifemark’s 300+ clinics in Canada. He is lead contributor in Pain BC’s Pain Foundations CE course and in the gentle movement@home video series, and lead contributor for the self-care for chronic pain and self care for low back pain health journeys in PC Health’s mobile app. Neil is currently working the Chronic Pain Centre of Excellence on an environmental scan (Canada, UK, USA) and systematic review of yoga for veterans with chronic pain.

Areas of specialty:
Physiotherapy, physiotherapy pain care, yoga class and 1:1 yoga therapy for people living in pain, patient pain education, health professionals continuing education on pain science and non-pharmacological pain care

 

Devan Reddy

Devan Reddy

Dr. Devan Reddy is a family physician in Prince George British Columbia. As the Medical Lead for Chronic Non-cancer pain for the Northern Health Authority he is passionate about advocating for and improving Pain Care Service delivery to patients. In his private practice he provides consultations for Chronic pain and provides interventions such as trigger point injections and ultrasound guided joint injections. When not doing clinical work he can be found doing his most favourite activity of being a dad and together with his family exploring the beauty and richness of British Columbia.

Areas of specialty:
family medicine, interventional pain care, trigger point therapy (myoActivation), ultrasound guided joint injections, medical leadership, information technology

 

Launette Rieb

Launette Rieb

Dr. Launette Rieb is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Family Practice at the University of British Columbia (UBC). She holds a Certificate of Added Competency in Addiction Medicine from the College of Family Physicians of Canada, and is a Diplomat of the American Board of Addiction Medicine. She was the co-creator and initial Physician Director of BC’s first Addiction Medicine Fellowship and contributed to the formation of BC’s first Pain Medicine Fellowship. She works and does research on pain and addiction, serving clinical populations through ActumHealth and St. Paul's Hospital. Dr. Rieb is the recipient of a UBC Post Graduate Teaching Award and the BC College of Family Physicians Exceptional Teacher Honour.

Areas of specialty:
Chronic pain rehabilitation and addiction medicine

 

Susan Reid Schellinck

Susan Reid Schellinck

Susan Reid Schellinck is an OT who works exclusively with people with chronic pain. She received her BSc from UVic, and OT degree from UBC. She is a local, provincial, national, and international speaker on functional aspects of chronic pain. She is clinical faculty for Pain BC and Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists, and is guest lecturer for UBC MScOT students. She was a subject matter expert for Pain BC’s Pain Foundations online course, and is on the Pain BC Project ECHO team hub. Susan is a board member for Canadian Neuromodulation Society, and PacificSport Vancouver Island. She tours Canada teaching other OTs about assessment and treatment of chronic pain. 

Areas of specialty:
pain education, CRPS, LBP, FM, making sense of pain, calming the nervous system, lifestyle/routines (sleep, stress, etc.) pain management, movement, re-establishing activities (work, leisure, social, cultural), MI, ACT, and play

 

Vishal Varshney

Vishal Varshney

Dr. Vishal Varshney is an anesthesiologist and pain medicine physician at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, BC. He completed medical school from the University of Calgary, and his anesthesiology residency at the University of British Columbia. He completed the RCPSC Pain Medicine residency at the University of Calgary. He has a special interest in neuromodulation and neuropathic pain, having authored several publications, book chapters and guidelines in this field, and is on the board of directors of the Canadian Neuromodulation Society.

Areas of specialty:
neuropathic pain management, neuromodulation for chronic cancer, non-cancer pain

 

Staff

How to become a Mentor or Mentee

Applications for BCAMN's inaugural cohort of Mentees are closed. The next intake is scheduled for March 2023.

View our short presentation for an overview on BCAMN and its impact on Mentees.

Additional Mentors will be recruited to join BCAMN with proposed start dates of April 2023 and April 2024. If you wish to be notified when new postings go online, please contact BCAMN Coordinator Kurt Du Bois kurt.dubois@painbc.ca.

Contact us

If you have questions about BCAMN, please email BCAMN Coordinator Kurt Du Bois at kurt.dubois@painbc.ca.